SEEKING JUSTICE - EN BUSCA DE JUSTICIA

Al pie en español

Fra Spansk tve
Klik på link:


http://www.rtve.es/mediateca/videos/20101105/testimonio-madres-soacha-tarde-24-horas/923257.shtml

.....................................................

SEEKING JUSTICE:
THE MOTHERS OF SOACHA



Background

Revelations in 2008 that the security forces had extrajudicially executed dozens of young men from Soacha, a poor neighbourhood near the capital Bogotá, forced the government to finally acknowledge that the security forces were responsible for extrajudicial executions and to adopt measures to combat the problem. The killings, which were falsely presented by the military as “guerrillas killed in combat” (and sometimes as “paramilitaries killed in combat”) were carried out in collusion with paramilitary groups or criminal gangs. The young victims were lured to the north of the country with promises of paid employment and were subsequently killed. In most of these cases, as a reward for having “killed a guerrilla member” soldiers received money, extra days of holiday and a congratulations letter from their superiors.

The national and international dimension of the scandal was such that it led in October 2008 to the sacking of 27 army officers, including three generals, and in November of that year forced the resignation of the head of the army, General Mario Montoya, who had been linked to human rights violations. President Uribe said the Soacha killings would be investigated by the civilian courts rather than by the military justice system, which often claims jurisdiction in such cases and then closes them without any serious investigation. The Office of the Attorney General is now investigating some 2,000 extrajudicial executions reportedly committed directly by members of the security forces over the last few decades.

Since the discovery of the mass graves in which some of the young men from Soacha were buried and the outcry which ensued, many of their mothers and other relatives who have been campaigning for justice, including the mothers and other relatives of those killed from Soacha, are being threatened and have been subjected to surveillance and harassment in an effort to stop their campaign.

In 2009, and largely as a consequence of the public outcry which ensued after the Soacha killings, dozens of members of the security forces were arrested in connection with these killings. However, in January 2010, those campaigning for justice suffered a serious setback when some 31 of the soldiers arrested were released by the courts on the grounds that they had not been formally indicted within 90 days of their arrest, as stipulated by Colombian law. Other members of the security forces implicated in the killings may also be released on the same grounds.



 

cases

LUZ MARINA PORRAS BERNAL

Luz Marina Porras Bernal’s son, Fair Leonardo Porras Bernal, was a 26-year-old man who disappeared on 8 January 2008. On 16 September of the same year his mother received a phone call which informed her that the body of her son had been found in a mass grave in the municipality of Ocaña, in the northwestern department of Norte de Santander. According to information released by army sources about his death, they said that he was a member of an illegal armed group and had died in combat on 12 January 2008. Subsequent investigations by the Attorney General’s office determined the falseness of this information and indicated that Fair Leonardo Porras Bernal had been extrajudicially executed by the army. Fair Leonardo Porras Bernal, as well as dozens of other young men from Soacha and other municipalities in Colombia, was taken from his home with false promises of work in another city when in reality he was taken to be killed by the army and presented as a member of an illegal armed group killed in combat.

Fair Leonardo’s Porras Bernal’s brother, John Smith Porras Bernal, began receiving threats after his mother, and other mothers from Soacha whose sons were victims of extrajudicial executions, began their campaign for justice. On 2 November 2009 a threatening letter was passed under the door of John Smith’s home in Soacha. The threat read: “It doesn’t matter that you hide and lock yourself in this apartment because you will get out and we will catch you, because we told you. If you don’t want anything to happen to you run away as soon as possible because you have little time. Do not forget we are not playing because we have already identified you, believe us we are not playing…” (asi se esconda y se encierre en eses apartamento usted sale porque sale y hay te vamos a coger porque se le advirtió… si no quieres que te pase nada larguese lo más pronto posible porque le queda muy poco tiempo no lo olvide no estamos jugando porque ya lo tenemos fichado crealo no estamos jugando…).

This is not the first threat that John Smith had received. On 20 October 2009 another threatening letter was sent to his house telling him “to take the consequences”. This threat made reference to a previous threat that was sent on 10 October 2009 and which stated that he and the other relatives of victims of extrajudicial executions from Soacha should keep quiet; they have not done so. Fearing for his safety and that of his relatives, John Smith decided to leave his home and family and move to another house in Soacha. It is thought that these threats against John Smith may be aimed to coerce Luz Marina Porras Bernal, his mother, to stop campaigning for justice.


Carmenza Gómez Romero

Carmenza Gómez Romero’s son, Víctor Fernando Gómez, was the victim of an extrajudicial execution committed by the security forces on 25 August 2008. She has been receiving threats, while another of her sons has been killed and one of her daughters has also received threatening calls.

John Nilson, Carmenza Gómez Romero’s son and brother of Víctor Fernando Gómez, was the victim of an attempt on his life in October 2008 when someone pushed him and he subsequently fell down from a 20 metres bridge in the municipality of Fusagasuga, 60 km from Bogotá. The day of the attack he was reportedly meant to meet with someone regarding the investigation into the killing of his brother.

According to her mother’s testimony, on 22 November 2008 John Nilson received a threatening phone call in which he was told: “Don’t you learn from experience, was it not enough with what happened to your brother, stop investigating” (No sirve la experiencia, no basta con lo de su hermanao, deje de investigar). John Nilson was shot dead on 4 February 2009.

After John Nilson’s death other family members continued to receive threats. On 4 March 2009, Luz Nidia Torres Gómez , Carmenza’s daughter received a threatening phone call, in which the caller said: “So, it comes up that you are denouncing, what do you want triple son-of-a-bitch, do you want to finish like your brother” (Con que ha puesto denunciar que es lo que quiere triple hijueputa, acabar como su hermano…).



Maria Ubilerma Sanabria López

Jaime Steven Valencia Sanabria, Maria Ubilerma Sanabria’s son, was extrajudicially executed on 8 February 2008. María Ubilerma Sanabria recovered the body and buried it in November 2008. A few days after the burial she began to receive threatening calls in which she was insulted and reminded to keep quiet.

On 7 March 2009 María Uliberma Sanabria was going to the school to pick up her granddaughter when two men on a motorbike approached her. The man at the back jumped off the bike and put her against the wall holding her from by the hair; meanwhile the other one was telling her: “…we are not playing, carry on opening your mouth and you will see that you will end up like your son, we do not play around you old son-of-a-bitch (…nosotros no estamos jugando siga abriendo esa jeta y vera que va a terminar como su hijo, nosotros no jugamos vieja hijueputa…).

Other relatives of Maria Ubilerma Sanabria, such as her daughters, have also been threatened.


Blanca Nubia Monroy

On 25 July 2009 at 9:30 pm two men dressed in military fatigues who were travelling on a motorbike stopped Blanca Nubia Monroy’s 15-year-old daughter and 17-year-old son. They were violently searched and interrogated about what they were doing at that time on the street and about where they lived. Although Blanca Nubia Monroy’s children were at the time accompanied by other youngsters, they were the only ones that were searched.

Blanca Nubia Monroy’s other son, Julián Oviedo Monroy, was extrajudicially executed on 3 March 2008.


Edilma Vargas Riojas

On 27 January 2008 Julio César Mesa Vargas, Edilma Vargas Riojas’ son, was extrajudicially executed by the security forces. Following her son’s disappearance she began to enquire around her neighbourhood about his whereabouts. She was told by a neighbour that it was better to stop asking. Due to these threats Edilma Vargas Riojas was forced to leave her house in the San Nicolás neighbourhood of Soacha.



Flor Hilda Hernández

On 15 August and 20 September 2009 Flor Hilda Hernández’s mobile phone and diary were stolen. Both the mobile phone and the diary contained the details of people and institutions that had helped her in the process of reporting the killing by the army of her son, Elkin Gustavo Verano, on 15 January 2008.



RECOMMENDATIONS

Amnesty International calls on the Colombian government to:

-
         
order full and impartial investigations into the threats received by Luz Marina Bernal Porras, Carmenza Gómez Romero, Maria Ubilerma Sanabria López, Blanca Nubia Monroy, Edilma Vargas Riojas, Flor Hilda Hernández and their relatives; publish the results and bring those responsible to justice; 
 

-
         
take decisive action to guarantee the safety of all those people named and their relatives, in line with the wishes of those to be protected;

-           order full and impartial investigations into the allegations of extrajudicial executions by members of the security forces, publish the results and bring those responsible to justice;

-           express concern that the recent release of some 30 members of the security forces implicated in the Soacha killings could represent a serious setback for the fight against impunity in Colombia, and call on the Colombian authorities to adopt measures to ensure justice in these cases.

  •  Write to Colombian government:

    President

    Dr. Francisco Santos Calderón

    Presidencia

    Carrera 8A No 7-27

    Bogotá, Colombia

    Fax: +57 1 444 2158

    say “Me da tono por favor”

    Salutation: Dear Vice-president/

    Sr. Vicepresidente

     

    Minister of Defence

    Dr. Gabriel Silva

    Avenida El Dorado, Carrera 52 OFI. 217, Centro Administrativo Nacional (CAN), Bogotá,  Colombia

    Fax: +57 1 266 0351

    Salutation: Dear Dr. Silva/Estimado Dr. Silva

     

     

    Attorney General

    Sr. Guillermo Mendoza Diago (e)

    Fiscal General de la Nación, Fiscalía General de la Nación

    Diagonal 22B (Av. Luis Carlos Galán No. 52-01) Bloque C, Piso 4, Bogotá, Colombia

    Fax: +57 1 414 91 08

    Salutation: Dear Attorney General/ Estimado Sr. Fiscal

 

and to: 

     

  • Spanish Presidency of the EU (January- June 2010)

    Sr. D. José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero

    Presidente del Gobierno

    Palacio de la Moncloa

    28071 Madrid

    If you want to write solidarity letters you should use the following address:
    MOVICE - Bogotá
    Movimiento Nacional de Víctimas de Crímenes de Estado

    Cr5 N. 16 14 Edificio Globo oficina  807
    Bogotá, Colombia




    Si quiere escribir mensajes de solidaridad a MOVICE
    MOVICE - Bogotá
    Movimiento Nacional de Víctimas de Crímenes de Estado

    Cr5 N. 16 14 Edificio Globo oficina  807
    Bogotá, Colombia
     

  • EN BUSCA DE JUSTICIA :
    LA MADRES DE SOACHA



    información general

    El descubrimiento en 2008 de que las fuerzas de seguridad habían ejecutado extrajudicialmente a decenas de hombres jóvenes de Soacha, una localidad pobre cercana a la capital, Bogotá, obligó al gobierno a reconocer finalmente que las fuerzas de seguridad eran responsables de ejecuciones extrajudiciales y a adoptar medidas para abordar el problema. Los homicidios, cuyas víctimas fueron falsamente presentadas por el ejército como “guerrilleros muertos en combate” (y en ocasiones como “paramilitares muertos en combate”), se llevaron a cabo en connivencia con grupos paramilitares o bandas de delincuentes. Los jóvenes habían sido atraídos al norte del país con promesas de empleo remunerado, pero posteriormente los mataron. En la mayoría de los casos los soldados recibieron dinero, días de permiso y una carta de felicitación de sus superiores, como recompensa por haber “matado a un miembro de la guerrilla”.

    La dimensión nacional e internacional del escándalo fue tal que causó la expulsión en octubre de 2008 de 27 oficiales del ejército, entre ellos tres generales , y en noviembre de ese mismo año la dimisión del jefe del ejército, General Mario Montoya, quien había sido relacionado con violaciones de derechos humanos. El presidente Uribe afirmó que los homicidios de los jóvenes de Soacha serían investigados por tribunales civiles y no por el sistema de justicia militar, que a menudo reclama la jurisdicción en casos de esa índole y luego los cierra sin llevar a cabo ninguna investigación seria. En la actualidad la Fiscalía General de la Nación está investigando unas 2.000 ejecuciones extrajudiciales que al parecer fueron cometidas directamente por miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad durante las últimas décadas.

    Desde el descubrimiento de las fosas comunes en las que fueron enterrados algunos de los jóvenes de Soacha y las protestas subsiguientes, las madres y otros familiares de las víctimas que han hecho campaña por la justicia han sido amenazados, hostigados y sometidos a vigilancia con el fin de silenciar su campaña.

    En 2009, y en buena medida a consecuencia de las protestas públicas que suscitaron los homicidios de los jóvenes de Soacha, decenas de miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad fueron detenidos en relación con estas muertes. Sin embargo, en enero de 2010, las personas que hacían campaña por la justicia sufrieron un serio revés cuando unos 31 soldados detenidos fueron liberados por los tribunales por “vencimiento de términos”, ya que la audiencia de su juicio oral no se había iniciado en un plazo de 90 días desde su detención, tal y como establece la legislación colombiana. Otros miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad implicados en los homicidios también pueden ser liberados por la misma razón.

     

    Casos

    LUZ MARINA PORRAS BERNAL

    El hijo de Luz Marina Porras Bernal, Fair Leonardo Porras Bernal, desapareció el 8 de enero de 2008, a los 26 años. El 16 de septiembre del mismo año su madre recibió una llamada telefónica en la que le informaron de que se había encontrado el cadáver de su hijo en una fosa común del municipio de Ocaña, en el departamento noroccidental de Norte de Santander. Según la información que facilitaron fuentes del ejército sobre su muerte, el fallecido era miembro de un grupo armado ilegal y había muerto en combate el 12 de enero de 2008. Investigaciones posteriores realizadas por la Fiscalía General de la Nación establecieron la falsedad de esta información e indicaron que Fair Leonardo Porras Bernal había sido ejecutado extrajudicialmente por el ejército. Fair Leonardo Porras Bernal, así como decenas de hombres jóvenes de Soacha y de otros municipios de Colombia, dejó su hogar atraído por falsas promesas de trabajo en otra ciudad, cuando en realidad iba a ser ejecutado por miembros del ejército y presentado como un miembro de un grupo armado ilegal muerto en combate.

    El hermano de Fair Leonardo Porras Bernal, John Smith Porras Bernal, comenzó a recibir amenazas después de que su madre, junto a otras madres de Soacha cuyos hijos habían sido víctimas de ejecuciones extrajudiciales, comenzó su campaña por la justicia. El 2 de noviembre de 2009, alguien deslizó una carta por debajo de la puerta del domicilio de John Smith en Soacha. La carta contenía la siguiente amenaza: “Así se esconda y se encierre en ese apartamento usted sale porque sale y hay te vamos a coger porque se le advirtió […] si no quieres que te pase nada lárguese lo más pronto posible porque le queda muy poco tiempo no lo olvide no estamos jugando porque ya lo tenemos fichado créalo no estamos jugando […].

    É sta no era la primera amenaza que recibía John Smith. Ya había recibido en su domicilio una amenaza por escrito el 20 de octubre, en la que le decían que “se atuviera alas consecuencias”, en referencia a una carta enviada el 10 de octubre en la que le advertían que tanto él como otras personas de Soacha cuyos familiares habían sido víctimas de ejecución extrajudicial a manos del ejército debían guardar silencio. No lo habían hecho. Temiendo por su seguridad y la de sus familiares, John Smith decidió dejar su casa y a su familia y trasladarse a otro domicilio en Soacha. Se cree que estas amenazas contra John Smith pretendían coaccionar a Luz Marina Porras Bernal, su madre, para que ponga fin a su campaña por la justicia.


    Carmenza Gómez Romero

    El hijo de Carmenza Gómez Romero, Víctor Fernando Gómez, fue víctima de una ejecución extrajudicial cometida por las fuerzas de seguridad el 25 de agosto de 2008. Ella ha recibido amenazas, mientras que otro de sus hijos ha muerto víctima de homicidio y una hija también ha recibido amenazas telefónicas.

    John Nilson, hijo de Carmenza Gómez Romero y hermano Víctor Fernando Gómez, sobrevivió a un atentado contra su vida ocurrido en el municipio de Fusagasuga, a 60 kilómetros de Bogotá, cuando fue empujado desde un puente de 20 metros de altura. Según los informes, el día del ataque debía mantener un encuentro con alguien relacionado con la investigación sobre el homicidio de su hermano.

    Según el testimonio de su madre, el 22 de noviembre de 2008 John Nilson recibió la siguiente amenaza en una llamada telefónica: “ No sirve la experiencia, no basta con lo de su hermano, deje de investigar”. John Nilson murió después de recibir varios disparos el 4 de febrero de 2009.

    Tras la muerte de John Nilson otros miembro s de la familia siguieron recibiendo amenazas. El 4 de marzo de 2009, Luz Nidia Torres Gómez , hija de Carmenza, recibió una llamada de teléfono en la que la persona que llamaba la amenazó en los términos siguientes: “Con que ha puesto denuncias que es lo que quiere triple hijueputa, acabar como su hermano […]”.



    Maria Ubilerma Sanabria López

    Jaime Steven Valencia Sanabria, hijo de Ubilerma Sanabria, fue ejecutado extrajudicialmente el 8 de febrero de 2008. María Ubilerma Sanabria recuperó el cadáver y lo enterró en noviembre de 2008. Pocos días después del entierro comenzó a recibir llamadas amenazadoras insultándola y recordándole que debía guardar silencio.

    El 7 de marzo de 2009 , María Ubilerma Sanabria se dirigía a recoger a su nieta del colegio cuando dos hombres montados en una motocicleta la abordaron. El hombre que iba sentado detrás del conductor saltó de la moto y, agarrándola por el cabello, la empujó contra la pared; mientras tanto, el otro le dijo: “[…] nosotros no estamos jugando siga abriendo esa jeta y vera que va a terminar como su hijo, nosotros no jugamos vieja hijueputa […]”

    Otros familiares de Maria Ubilerma Sanabria, entre ellos sus hijas, también han recibido amenazas.



    Blanca Nubia Monroy

    El 25 de julio de 2009 a las 9:30 de la noche, dos hombres montados en una motocicleta y vestidos con trajes de faena del ejército dieron el alto a la hija de 15 años de Blanca Nubia Monroy y a su hijo de 17. Los registraron violentamente y les preguntaron qué hacían a esas horas en la calle y dónde vivían. Aunque los hijos de Blanca Nubia Monroy se encontraban en compañía de otros adolescentes, sólo los registraron a ellos.

    Otro hijo de Blanca Nubia Monroy, Julián Oviedo Monroy, fue ejecutado extrajudicialmente el 3 de marzo de 2008.


    Edilma Vargas Riojas

    El 27 de enero de 2008 Julio César Mesa Vargas, hijo de Edilma Vargas Riojas fue ejecutado extrajudicialmente por las fuerzas de seguridad. Tras la desaparición de su hijo, ella comenzó a hacer preguntas en el vecindario para averiguar su paradero. Un vecino le dijo que era mejor que dejara de hacer preguntas. Tras estas amenazas, Edilma Vargas Riojas se vio obligada a abandonar su casa en el vecindario de San Nicolás, en Soacha.



    Flor Hilda Hernández

    El 15 de agosto y el 20 de septiembre de 2009 a Flor Hilda Hernández le robaron el teléfono móvil y una agenda. Ambos contenían datos de per sonas e instituciones que le habían ayudado en el proceso de denunciar el homicidio de su hijo, Elkin Gustavo Verano, a manos del ejército, el 15 de enero de 2008.



    RECOM ENDACIONES

    Amnistía Internacional insta al gobierno colombiano a :

    • O rdenar investigaciones completas e imparciales sobre las amenazas recibidas por Luz Marina Bernal Porras, Carmenza Gómez Romero, Maria Ubilerma Sanabria López, Blanca Nubia Monroy, Edilma Vargas Riojas, Flor Hilda Hernández y sus familiares; hacer públicos los resultados y llevar a los responsables ante la justicia;

    • Emprender acciones decisivas para garantizar la seguridad de todas las personas citadas y de sus familiares, de acuerdo con su voluntad.

    • Ordenar investigaciones completas e imparciales sobre las denuncias de ejecuciones extrajudiciales a manos de miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad, hacer públicos los resultados y llevar a los responsables ante la justicia.


      Si quiere escribir mensajes de solidaridad a MOVICE  usen la dirección siguiente:
      MOVICE - Bogotá
      Movimiento Nacional de Víctimas de Crímenes de Estado

      Cr5 N. 16 14 Edificio Globo oficina  807
      Bogotá, Colombia